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❶Some questions will ask you about specific structural elements of the passage—a shift in tone, a digression, the specific form of a poem, etc.

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Since this exam is now publicly available, you can use the questions without restriction. The Released Exam and the Released Exam are two resources you can use with your students throughout the year. Some information in these Released Exams may not reflect the current course and exam. A literary analysis of a given poem A literary analysis of a given passage of prose fiction this may include drama An analysis that examines a specific concept, issue, or element in a work of literary merit selected by the student.

Exam Questions and Scoring Information For free-response questions from prior exams, along with scoring information, check out the tables below. Secure Exams for Classroom Use Includes sample student responses and scoring commentary. Available on the AP Course Audit site. Log in to your account and then click on the Secure Documents link within the Resources section of your Course Status page. Two sets of student essays From the open-ended free-response question on the AP English Literature Exam—one focusing on The Great Gatsby and the other on unusual student-selected texts—also available on the AP Course Audit website.

The bottom line is: Teach Yourself the Material: Since you are probably only in their presence for an hour or two, they have learned to prioritize the material they have to teach.

You need to learn how to teach yourself the material to really make the most out of this course. You can really get creative with this. You can teach yourself by conducting good old fashioned research, or just by reading the assigned texts. Or, you can expand your knowledge a little more. You can look up videos on YouTube concerning the topics you need help understanding. Learn How to Analyze Text: Analyzing literary text is an incredibly large portion of the AP English Literature course.

Deconstruct the text and examine its theme, look for literary devices, and motives. Therefore, you should be getting a good amount of reading done.

This does not necessarily mean that you have to aim to read an outrageous number of books or anything.

You just need to at least make an attempt to read every day. As you read, try to dissect the depth of the text. Understanding a concept you previously had trouble with is sure to be a huge weight off of your shoulders. Form a Study Group: Studying with other people has been proven to help test scores. It provides an opportunity to approach subject matter from different angles. Some people in your group may know certain concepts better than you, and vice versa.

One of the best ways to make sure you know the material is to teach it to others. Everyone has different preferences when it comes to studying. Perhaps you like to listen to material to really understand it. The best way to find out what form of studying helps you best is to experiment.

Try different methods to see what works best for you. Plus, keeping a variety in your study routine helps keep boredom at bay. First, Read the Passages: Yes, you read that correctly. One vital thing to remember is this: On a timed exam, it is important to work at a brisk pace, but do not move so quickly that you make simple mistakes.

Look Deep Within the Text: Was it to inform or persuade the audience? Perhaps the author used some literary devices like allusions or irony. Closely read the passages and you will have no problem identifying the answers to questions that are specific to the literature side of AP English. Carefully Read the Questions: Take a deep breath and calmly read the questions, dissecting them completely.

This will be easier to do for some questions than for others. Once you understand what it is exactly the question is asking, try to recall where in the passage the answer could be located. Also be sure to read the question in its entirety.

Sometimes, the writers of the test will throw in certain words or phrases that lead the question in a different direction. Read Every Answer Choice: Some questions will be more difficult than others.

Some questions are even designed to trip you up. Be sure to read every single word in every single answer choice; sometimes one word can make all the difference as to whether or not an answer is correct. Reread Parts of the Passage: If time permits, reread the parts of the text in which answers are located.

Be sure the information matches one of the answer choices. You may even want to put a star, dash, or some other marking beside portions of the text that contain answers. That way, if you have extra time at the end of the test, you can go back and check your answers more quickly. Use Your Time Wisely: This is a timed exam. This allows for an average of a minute per question, with some leftover time to account for reading passages. Luckily, there is no penalty for answers marked wrong—or answers not marked at all—on the AP English Literature exam.

Then, if you have some time at the end of the test, you can go back and see if you can come up with the answer. If you are a fast worker, this tip may prove extremely helpful for you. A few of the multiple-choice questions may test your overall comprehension of the passages you read. In the margins of the page beside the passage, jot down a few bullet points outlining the plot progression.

This way you can refer back to your notes when answering questions rather than searching the entire text. Flashcards are a great way to study specific terms or brief concepts. Since you will be tested on your understanding of certain terms, it is important that you know them like the back of your hand. Try making flashcards of different literary devices and review them periodically throughout the semester.

This may seem a bit extreme, but it really helps. Keep them in your wallet, in your purse, or even in your car. Whenever you have a moment of free time, instead of scrolling through Twitter or Facebook on your phone, run through a review of your terms.

The most helpful and effective way to prepare for the multiple-choice portion of the AP English Literature exam is by testing yourself. Prepare early in the semester for the exam. There are several websites out there dedicated to helping you quiz yourself for the AP Literature exam.

One of these is Albert. The AP English Literature exam is one big test. Sure, it affects the amount of college credit you receive coming out of high school. Anxiety and stress can severely affect your ability to function correctly. Over time, it can even start to have negative effects on your mind and body. Some people even develop anxiety disorders.

Just remember, your mental health is more important than your grades. Take a deep breath periodically throughout the test. In this portion, you have two hours to complete three essays. This section tests your ability to analyze passages and dissect them to form logical interpretations to be illustrated in your essays. Here are some tips for nailing the free response portion of the AP English Literature and Composition exam: The first step towards writing an awesome essay on the AP Literature exam is reading and understanding the question.

What are the authors of the test asking for specifically? Each essay is read by a different reader. They score essays on a point scale. AP final grades of are then derived from this composite score. Individual colleges and universities may vary. Observations of the Chief Reader: Read each prompt of each question very carefully. Think about the implications of the question, begin thinking about how you will organize your response, and focus on what is asked.

Often, students are asked to select a play or a novel to answer a particular question. Make sure they know that the work they have selected should be appropriate to the question asked. See to it that students have a fair range of readings that they feel familiar with, ones with which they can test the implications of the question and make the decision of the appropriateness of the work to the question asked.

Without this flexibility they may force an answer that will come across as canned to the AP Reader. Remind students to enter into the text itself, to supply concrete illustrations that substantiate the points they are making.

Have them take command of what they are writing with authority by means of direct quotation of pertinent information from the text, always writing into the question and never away from it.

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The AP Literature exam is a three-hour exam: It includes one question, hour-long multiple-choice section based on four-five prose and poetry passages, and a two hour free-response section with three essays—one analyzing a poetry passage, one analyzing a prose passage, and one analyzing a work chosen by the student.

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Over the course of the last three years, I have tried this with 9th graders and with students in both AP Literature and AP Language. I have also shared this with some of my Writing Project colleagues, many of whom have also found the process to be beneficial. Sep 04,  · We offer a wide variety of writing services including essays, research papers, term papers, thesis among many others. We have a lot of experience in the academic writing industry. We .

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Tips from an AP reader; Suggest Readings; Practice! How are the English Literature exams scored? The multiple choice section is machine scored. Students receive one point for each correct answer and are penalized a quarter point for each incorrect response. § Use clear transitions that help the reader follow the flow of your essay. Keep. The Ultimate List of AP English Literature Tips The AP English Literature and Composition exam is designed to test your ability to think critically and analyze literary excerpts. The test is three hours long and consists of a multiple-choice portion (worth 45% of your grade) and an essay portion (worth 55% of .